Morning Routines of Highly Successful Women

Ah, mornings. The precious time you spend before the madness and craziness that the day entails takes a hold on you. How do you use that precious time? Ever wonder how your favorite #bossbabes get a decent start to a super-busy day? Most, highly successful women are up between 4am-7am, eat a healthy breakfast, and manage to get a workout in all before they go in the office to take over the world. If you're not setting yourself up for world domination during your precious morning hours, don't trip girl.  We've rounded up the morning routines of 5 highly successful women from the fashion industry to inspire your mornings.

Remember, you have just as many hours in the day as Beyoncé...

Tory Burch, CEO & Designer for Tory Burch LLC

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(photo by The French Tangerine)

 

05:45 "Get up and flip through WWD and the New York Times, put on a T-shirt and shorts and wake up my 11-year-old twins, Nick and Henry, to go for a run in the park. Now that they are older they have started coming with me in the morning. I love starting the day with them.

07:00 Wake up my youngest son, Sawyer, and start the morning trying to get my three boys showered, fed and out the door for school.

08:15 After showering, I get dressed and drop the boys off at school. I answer emails that have come in from Europe and Asia overnight while stuck in traffic heading across town.

10:45 Get to the office and sit down with my assistants, Kristi and Caroline, to start making plans for my trip to India this summer. I am going with a few members of our design team and one of my step-daughters on an inspiration trip."

(british vogue)

She told Into the Gloss, “In the morning I usually walk out the door with a wet head, put my hair in a low ponytail and go out for the day—not very exciting. I don’t blow dry my hair, except when I go to a party, just so it’s a little bit more presentable. I prefer the look of my hair when it dries naturally—not too perfect or too straight."

Jenna Lyons, Creative Director and President of J. Crew

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(photo by MyDomaine)

 

7:35 A.M. I wake up as late as I possibly can. The first thing I do is hit the snooze button. I love the snooze button—it's really a drug. I give myself maybe half an hour before I have to be out the door. One of my assistants gave me a T-shirt that says SORRY I'M LATE. After I'm up, I check my phone just to make sure that no emergencies have arisen, and then I pick out clothes for my son, Beckett. He definitely has a preference for cashmere—I've created a monster. Then I have coffee: strong, but half milk. I always drink it iced. My favorite thing in the world is coffee ice cream, so I try to get my coffee to taste as close to coffee ice cream as I can. I do my makeup in about five minutes, and I get dressed in about three minutes. I definitely don't have a work uniform. The idea of a uniform is like a slow and painful death to me. There is nothing I like more than getting dressed. Sometimes Beckett picks out my shoes. The only thing is, he's got a one-track mind. I have these flat shoes, Christian Louboutin, with spikes all over them. If left up to him, I would wear them far too frequently. I go with probably month rotations for my bags. Right now it's a Céline mirror-metallic bag. But honestly, the bigger the coat pockets, the better. I like not having a purse. For beauty products, I swear by this woman, Aida Bicaj. She does my facials, and she has this stuff, called Biologique Recherche, that's changed my facial life. Genetically, I was not gifted with good skin, so I need all the help I can get.

8:00 A.M. I take Beckett to school in Brooklyn and then head to the office. It's about an hour and 15 minutes all in. We take a car service, which is nice because I get the morning ride with him. At the moment he's doing this thing where I have to drop him off at the curb, and he's like, "Mommy, don't kiss me—it's embarrassing." I'm like, "What? You're six!" In the car I try to catch up on e-mails and make sure I see Women's Wear Daily and the New York Post—I get everything on my phone. I travel light, probably too light. I just have my wallet, my glasses, my keys, and my iPhone. That's it.

9:15 A.M. When I get to work, I usually touch base with my assistants, Nichole and Wendell, but they would tell you that's not the case. My preferred mode of communication is silence! I get probably 200-plus e-mails and more than 100 texts a day. I check my Instagram far too much, like in the middle of meetings, which I need to stop doing. It's so sad. The overarching theme here is no bullshit. The first day the intercoms were being installed at the J. Crew offices I was like, "What the hell is that?" But it's awesome. Mickey Drexler, J. Crew's CEO, is sort of like a fireball of kinetic energy; he has more energy than my six-year-old. He had the intercom installed, and he uses it mostly to make sure he can get someone immediately. He'll say, "Jenna, dial 001," and you know where-ever you are, even in the bathroom, you can hear you're being paged. Sometimes he just uses it to pipe in bad music. The other day he played "Come On Eileen," which he's really into. I hate that song. The idea of a uniform is like a slow and painful death to me. There is nothing I like more than getting dressed.

(Harper's Bazaar)

Shiona Turini, Contributing Editor at The Cut

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(photo via Hello Beautiful)

She told the Coveteur, “I start every day by walking to my corner Starbucks and then I take a walk along the East River unless I’m exercising that day. My schedule is so unpredictable that I can’t always rely on being able to get to a gym or go for a run. Because I’m from an island, to see the water in the morning is my version of meditation and centering myself. Then I do emails and work and have meetings in the afternoon because it gets me out of the house and sets a good purpose and flow to my day.

“Getting up and walking for coffee is a really important ritual when I’m working from home. I need something consistent that gets me out of the house because if not you wake up, go on your computer, and then you go to sleep and you’re still on the computer. I truly was spending 22 hours a day working, so leaving the house was such an important [part of the day].”

“[...]My clothes are quite complicated so I need my makeup to be super simple, easy to use, and get me out the door in fifteen minutes. I don’t even carry a bag. Because all I really need is my credit card and phone.”

Jennifer Hyman, Rent the Runway Co-Founder

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(photo via Cosmopolitan)

 

She tells Inc.,"The first thing I do in the morning is look at my iPhone calendar, so I can figure out how to dress. If I have meetings with employees in the office, I can wear my Lululemon comfy clothes. If I'm meeting with a clothing designer, I might put on a Moschino dress and Louboutins. I usually end up running around the city like a crazy person in 4-inch heels. I frequently wear dresses from our inventory, but Rent the Runway has totally changed the way I shop. Now I invest in key pieces that I'll have forever."

"[...] I walk to work, which is one of the perks of convincing my boyfriend, Peter [Mack], to move to the West Village. I get to the office around 8:30. It feels a bit like a newsroom. It's a big open space—no cubicle walls or offices. I sit at the end of a long desk with eight members of our marketing team."

Maddy Maxey, Founder and President of The Crated

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(photo via The Cut)

"I'm a fan of early morning hours and as long as I haven't stayed up too late working, I try to be up by 6 a.m. to go for a jog. I generally find myself working whenever I'm not sleeping, exercising, or spending time with a friend. My work consists of everything from e-mailing to mixing up chemical formulas to writing code to ideating about the future of smart-textiles."

(Elle)

 

 

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